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Multiple Mini Interview (MMI)

Medical school Multiple Mini Interview (MMI) tracks typically involve 10 different stations, each with 1 interviewer, plus 1 rest station. A question or scenario will be posted on or beside the door of each room and you will have 2 minutes to read it and formulate your answer. Then, a bell/whistle will sound and you will have 6-8 minutes (depending on the school) to do the station. When time is up, another bell will ring, marking the beginning of the 2-minute prep for the next station.

MMIs have evolved to include different station types. While these types may differ by school, here are 5 common ones:

Personal Station

As expected, all MMI tracks will likely have a station enquiring about you and your fit with the profession. Expect to be asked “Why do you want to be a doctor?” and be ready to explain a genuine answer. Even if the questions are variations on this theme, you will be prepared to describe your motivation to pursue this career and what personal attributes will benefit you in the doctor role. Personal stations are great opportunities to briefly incorporate relevant past experiences.

Common MMI Station Types

Photo Station

Here you will be asked to view and discuss a photo. The photo may be medically related, perhaps of a patient in hospital, or it may be abstract and unrelated to medicine. Your task is to describe what is happening in the photo. Let your observation skills shine and, if there are people in the photo, explain how they might be feeling.

Video Station

Some schools have video stations, where you will watch a short film during the 2-minute “reading” period and then summarize and discuss what it was about. Like the photo station, it may be medically-related or not.

Actor Station

These stations differ in that you will be interacting with a professional actor while an evaluator silently observes. You often are given brief instructions on the door regarding the task you will be doing or the discussion you will be having with the actor. Actors may be difficult; this is by design. The key is to remain calm and professional in your communication.

Career Station

Career stations will ask you to ponder trends in the medical profession or ethical scenarios you may encounter as a doctor. You should read about and consider professional responsibilities in medicine, current changes in the workforce, challenges doctors face, and how our healthcare system works.

The best way to prepare for anything the MMI may throw at you is to practice with people who have been through the real MMI. Our team of medical consultants have all passed the MMI and many have been interviewers. See how they can help you here.

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